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Brazen Review ~ What The World Eats, Faith D'Aluisio, Peter Menzel

  The age-old practice of sitting down to a family meal is undergoing unprecedented change as rising world affluence and trade, along with the spread of global food conglomerates, transform eating habits worldwide. HUNGRY PLANET profiles 30 families from around the world--including Bosnia, Chad, Egypt, Greenland, Japan, the United States, and France--and offers detailed descriptions of weekly food purchases; photographs of the families at home, at market, and in their communities; and a portrait of each family surrounded by a week's worth of groceries. Featuring photo-essays on international street food, meat markets, fast food, and cookery, this captivating chronicle offers a riveting look at what the world really eats.




What Does A Week's Worth Of Food For Your Family Look Like?

This is the question WTWE explores.  After the opening section, World On A Plate, D'Aluisio and Menzel introduce readers to 25 families from around the globe through story and images.  The result is highly impactful.  Twenty-two countries are profiled - each offering a unique picture of life and food.




Sprinkled amongst the family profiles, D'Aluisio included fascinating and disturbing facts such as population poverty statistics, amount in USD of per year monies spent on health care, and sugar/sweet consumption per person per year - in pounds.  Yeah...the disturbing part. 





The striking realization of how blessed we are where food is concerned will not be easily forgotten, nor would I want it to.  I've always known we live in a land of plenty and wealth, but connecting personally with the individual families by reading their stories and glimpsing into their lives hit that truth home powerfully.




An interesting and informative read, WTWE rates a top pick for readers curious on the topic. 

Overall Rating - ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣



Moíra ♣

Comments

  1. Just comparing the layout of food for a week from the first two pictures to the third made my heart drop. The significant difference is astounding. This book sounds like an eye opener for for some, a verification of things believed.

    I sat here trying to imagine what a weeks worth of food would look like for me but shamefully, it would look like a pre-processed schmogesborg.

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  2. I am so glad you enjoyed this post. After I read, I decided to gather my shopping order on the table before I put it away. Wow! To see a week's worth of food - to realize the abundance before me...it was surreal. The stories in WTWE touched me. I'm so glad I read this book. Thanks for visiting the Broads!

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